Why We Turn Away Millions In Revenue

We send a lot of email on behalf of our users. Billions. Despite a large volume of email being sent we work every day to ensure our compliance standards are being met and the recipients actually expect and want the email. By having such high standards (more than some other ESP’s) we close many paid accounts on a daily basis. We don’t enjoy closing accounts, but when our end user is unable or unwilling to modify their marketing practices we have no other choice. By doing so we maintain a high level of deliverability and promote/allow responsible marketing.

Let’s look at some figures

We ran a report to find the revenue we have turned away within the last year. These are users who have signed up, converted, and wanted to use our platform.
And that is recurring revenue…   The true revenue we are turning away over time is many times more.  Mind you these are not fraud orders and they are often not even people with horrible intent. They are companies within markets we don’t support or people who wish to market in a way that we don’t believe in.
If we dive into the data deeper we start to find some interesting things. The average person that we have to turn away is not your stereotypical spammer. Instead they are simply misinformed or operating in a high risk market for sending email.

Why we do it

There are the obvious deliverability concerns that come with questionable senders. By only allowing the best practices and best senders we are going to get better deliverability overall. But that pales in comparison with our own views, our hatred of spam, and wanting to ensure we only contribute to a positive email ecosystem.

What’s the solution?

Email remains a powerful and high ROI marketing option for businesses.  Sadly it is often abused.  We want to make sure we are on the right side of things and help to make email lower in volume while being more relevant and useful.
We will continue to educate those who are not aware of the best practices.  By educating people about quality being greater than quantity we have helped them improve their overall marketing effectiveness.

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  • http://businessofarchitecture.com/ Enoch Sears

    Interesting article Jason. It would be helpful to have some “anonymous” examples of what you are talking about and the practices that are red flags so we can be informed and make sure we are on the good side!